What Are The Long Term Side Effects Of Sleeping Pills?

What is the best natural sleep aid?

8 Natural Sleep Aids: What Works?Benefits.Chamomile.Valerian.Hops.Melatonin.Passionflower.Lavender.Ginseng.More items….

What is the best medication for anxiety and insomnia?

Antidepressants : Some antidepressant drugs, such as trazodone (Desyrel), are very good at treating sleeplessness and anxiety. Benzodiazepines: These older sleeping pills — emazepam (Restoril), triazolam (Halcion), and others — may be useful when you want an insomnia medication that stays in the system longer.

Are sleeping pills bad for your heart?

SATURDAY, May 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) — A new study suggests that the use of sleeping pills greatly increases the risk of serious heart problems and death in people with heart failure.

Is it bad to take sleeping pills everyday?

If you’re taking sleeping pills, it’s important to only use them with your doctor’s OK and according to his or her instructions. If you take them too often, they can actually make your sleep problems worse.

How long can you take sleeping pills?

Only take pills for a short time Generally, Dr. Vensel-Rundo says, doctors recommend patients use sleep aids nightly for two to four weeks. If you need help longer, they suggest you only take the medication as needed, such as three nights weekly.

How many mg of sleeping pills is safe?

At 600 mg, a user is entering overdose limitations, and serious damage is likely. Death is reported at doses higher than 2,000 mg, but a lethal dose may still occur at lower amounts.

Are sleeping pills bad for your brain?

Your brain on sleeping pills Sleeping pills have the potential to contribute to memory problems. This is particularly true with benzodiazepine sedatives, such as diazepam (Valium), temazepam (Restoril), lorazepam (Ativan), oxazepam, and alprazolam (Xanax).

What happens if you take sleeping pills and stay awake?

Those who take sleeping pills and stay awake to get high may end up taking multiple doses to maintain pleasant effects, which can also lead to overdose. It takes time for the body to completely process sleeping pills, and if they are still present in the body when another dose is taken, the chance of overdose goes up.